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Roadside Cottages at Sarclet

Roadside Cottages at Sarclet, watercolour, 16 x 26 cm

Available, £140


A group of the long, single-storey crofters' cottages that are typical of rural Caithness. 



 

Comments

Debbie Nolan said…
Love how you captured the light of the day with your great values. This scene is beautiful...hope your month of November is off to a great start. :)!
Keith Tilley said…
Thank you Debbie. November is always a bit of a shock to the system here, because summertime daylight-saving has ended, with the clocks being put back one hour. Suddenly the days seem much shorter when the sun sets around 4.00! There are still some lovely colours around though, to brighten up the days.

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