Skip to main content

A Royal Invitation

I had an exciting day last weekend. I had a phone call from The Castle of Mey to say that The Prince of Wales would like to see me. They said that he liked my paintings and he would be interested in seeing any that I had, framed or unframed. I wasn't sure how many to take, so I loaded up the van with as many as I could manage and drove over there.

When I got there I was directed through the police cordon and met, at the gate, by Prince Charles's equerry. He took a handful of paintings from me and led me through passages and up winding stairs to the private rooms, where HRH was waiting. He was very friendly and informal and we were soon spreading paintings all round the room on the furniture. He asked questions about some of them and we talked a bit about painting (he paints as well when he can). Then he said that he liked the one that he bought last year and would like to buy another. He chose this one of 'Peedie Sands', which I've shown here before. I think he liked the way that I had scratched out the seagulls against the cliff.


Cliffs at Peedie Sands
Watercolour
32 x 23 cm


It was all over fairly quickly, because I think he was due to leave to travel south to Balmoral. I think he had just managed to find the time to see me, but I feel very honoured that he thought of me when he has such a busy schedule.

Comments

  1. Hi Keith!... Let me be the first to congratulate "You" on the great honour that you have received... and it is well earned and deserved I might add!

    HRH has good taste in choosing this seascape. He has produced a good number of nice watercolours in his day.. I've read his book!

    Wonderful news Keith!

    Good Painting... and continued success!
    Warmest regards,
    Bruce

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is truly wonderful as Bruce says. Congratulations.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I do like his watercolours and have almost bought his book too. I think it is so lovely to hear he has bought another painting from you, well done.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Bruce, Elizabeth and Caroline, thanks for your comments. I've read the book by the Prince of Wales as well. It was quite a few years ago and I remember being impressed with the work. Like most of us, I suppose, he is modest about his own paintings when he talks about them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is a fabulous painting and story. Congrats on your recognition. I'm off to look at more of your blog now.

    Btw. I've just arrived here via JWJarts & someone else's blogs.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow Keith, I didn't know you had royal connections. LOL. What a fabulous honour. Congratulations. HRH has excellent taste.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi sue, thanks for looking in and for your comment.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks John. It's amazing what life can throw your way sometimes.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wow! Congratulations. I like Prince Charles' watercolors very much. Lucky you.
    Jean

    ReplyDelete
  10. wow how exciting keith
    i'm proud i know you!
    he choose a good one,it's a very strong image
    and the schratched sea gulls are ace

    ReplyDelete
  11. WOW... What an honor!!!

    And a lovely painting too. I would have been beside myself with excitement!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks Marian.

    It was a strange mixture of being exciting and very informal at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Congratulations Keith! Your work is so fresh and wonderful. I am y thrilled that you are in the collection, twice!!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks Debra. Once was an honour, but twice was amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Keith, I thought I'd take a few minutes to go through your posts, and came across this and then your other where you'd sold to the Prince. Some years ago I bought his book , still have and look at it. I like his style and yours too, I must say!! I also wanted to tell you how very different our landscapes are and I can see why you are so inspired. BJ

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Barbra Joan. I think the Prince is inspired by some of the same artists that I admire. Edward Seago is one of them and he was closely associated with the Royal Household. HRH told me that had some lessons from him.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

North Coast 500

In 2015 the North Highland Initiative started a project to boost tourism in the northern counties of Scotland. The idea was to publicise a 500 mile route through Inverness-shire, Ross & Cromarty, Sutherland and my home county of Caithness, and promote it as a superb road trip. I don't know how successful they expected it to be, but it has quickly become very popular and has been called one of the top five coastal routes in the World. In fact its popularity is becoming a problem for the local residents: some of the roads are single-track, with bays at intervals to allow two vehicles to pass each other, but there is an etiquette for their use that strangers are not always aware of. The result is that local people going about their business find themselves held up by slow-moving tourist vehicles, so if you use the route please pull over and allow other vehicles to pass. The amount of traffic will probably also cause damage to the roads, which were not intended for heavy use. Desp…

Old Broubster Village

Throughout the Highlands in the Nineteenth Century, tenant farmers were evicted from their homes, or 'crofts', during the notorious Highland Clearances. Landowners, in a drive for efficiency and more profitable land use, wanted to replace the old system of small-holdings with large sheep ranches. The crofters were forced out of their scattered homes, often in a brutal manner, and re-housed in new communities. The land that they were given was often of poor quality and they had to work hard to maintain even a subsistence level of life. During this period many people took up the offer of a new life overseas, emigrating to Canada, New Zealand and Australia, where their descendants still have strong links with Scotland.

In 1839 tenants from the estates of Broubster and Shurrery, in Caithness, were resettled in a new village. Land was provided for them, but they probably had to build their own houses. The dwellings were in the form of long-houses, which consisted of a …

Christmas Wishes

A couple of my latest watercolours and -

Best Wishes to all for Christmas

"The Fuel Bowser", Watercolour, 24 x 18 cm

"View at Skelbo", Watercolour, 16 x 26 cm

www.keithtilley.co.uk